Tuesday, 13 June 2017

Liberty quilt question

Just a quick post today to announce that I've finally finished the top for my Liberty quilt. My god it was gruelling, it seemed to take forever! 


The quilt won't actually be needed until the autumn, which gives me time to do a spot of research and brace myself for the next stage. All but one of the fabrics I used in the quilt top are Liberty Tana Lawn, which is noticeably lighter and finer than quilting cotton. My question is, do I need to add an additional layer of light cotton fabric (cotton muslin for instance) to the quilt top to provide extra strength and support? Or will it be OK once everything is quilted together? I've spent so long piecing it all together, I want to make sure the quilt has a good, long life! 



I know there are some experienced quilters who read my blog - I'm just hoping they're reading this post! If any of you have quilted with Liberty lawn (or indeed any thin cotton lawn), I'd appreciate your advice. Thank you!

Now all I have to do is quilt the bloody thing...  

40 comments:

  1. I don't yet have experience of making an adult size Liberty quilt though as a lifelong tana lawn obsessive I have sewn with it a lot. It's a fair question as the fabric seems so soft. I looked up two quilts in The Liberty Book of Simple Sewing and two in The Liberty Book of Home Sewing and none of them back the tana lawn patchwork side and two use lawn as the quilt backing too. It will be glorious - good luck with the quilting!

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    1. Duh! I'm such a halfwit sometimes, I have both those books and it didn't occur to me to look in them, thank you! I'm sure it will be robust enough, I'm just being extra cautious. x

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  2. Jane i think it os delicious and also think that underlining it is a good idea. When I make a silk quilt I always foundation it with calico - it has to do with the seams pulling away more easily because of the lighter fabric. The thing is, I reckon you need a really light cotton to underline it with, like a voile, not something too solid like calico. It would sort of turn it into a double gauze, which is so lux. Then you can use a cotton or a wool batting inside it for ultimate soft scrumminess.
    Is there any Alma in it? I am so in love with that print since I saw it in your post about making ties. I've made a dress from it and have a piece of lantana for a cross season smock. Yum!

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    1. Great advice, thanks Maryanne. Alas, there's no Alma in it - I wasn't far thinking enough to nab some from my friend Joe when he made his tie, Doh!

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  3. It's gorgeous. I've tagged my friend who is a gun quilter on Instagram, she's recently made an amazing liberty scrap quilt xx

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    1. She replied on Instagram - thank you! x

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  4. I wouldn't think you'd need another layer under the top. Quilting should hold it all together, especially if you opt for an all-over design rather than just quilting in the ditch (along the piecing lines). After all, the quilting stitch is what's supposed to hold the top, batting and backing all together. Lovely piece and I hope it brings you years of warmth and comfort!

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    1. Thank you, I was thinking of adding an all over design at the quilting stage so that's good to know. x

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  5. You've done a superior job matching intersections.

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    1. I have to confess, I did choose the most perfect ones to photograph! x

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  6. I would underline it just for the stability. It would also put less stress on the top fabric where there is stitching. Are you planning on hand or machine stitching?

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    1. Machine stitching, so will consider underlining, thanks! x

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  7. Oh isn't that gorgeous! Obsessed with Liberty fabric, as my bank account will attest to, although most of it remains in stash as I'm too scared to use it.

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    1. I love Liberty fabric too, you should be brave and use it though, it's gorgeous to work with! x

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  8. Hi Tana lawn may be soft but it is a very strong tightly woven cotton. You should not need to line it. Love your quilt.

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    1. I agree, it is a very good, robust fabric, which it suppose is reflected in the price. Thanks for the advice! x

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  9. I think you should use a light underlining like a plain quilting cotton. The Tana lawn is lovely, but not as stable as quilting cotton. You might find it difficult to quilt (puckers, shifting) without a firmer fabric supporting it.

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    1. Thanks Lynn, will consider that. x

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  10. I would have said that if you intended using the quilt then I would have underlined it with something light. I would have thought muslin a little too light.
    If you had handstitched your quilt I would definitely underline it after all that hard work.
    Depends how you quilt it I suppose - that would tend to strengthen it as well
    Its beautiful by the way cant wait to see the finished article.
    Angela

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    1. There won't be any hand stitching on this quilt I'm afraid - it will all be machined! x

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  11. Jane your quilt is gorgeous! They are a lot of work; especially if you are going to quilt it at home on your machine. Whew! Looks like its a queen size? Really pretty. I have been quilting for over 25 years and have done a lot of quilts, honestly not any in Tana lawn, but that is cotton and it is strong. I wouldn't line your quilt, with the batting and backing and machine over all quilting; it will be a fine quilt. It should last a long, long time.

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    1. That's what I'm hoping Barb, thank you! It's probably a double sized quilt, I got a bit carried away adding rows and it's ended up bigger than I intended! x

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  12. Never pieced quilt in my life, but I'd be inclined to underline it with something light - voile, or more lawn. I think it's probably worth making the effort. it will be beautiful.

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    1. That's exactly why I'm seeking advice, I want to get it right after putting in all that effort! x

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  13. Really pretty quilt Jane, i would go with what the others have said. I always add an extra thin lining but that's my own choice. I always get my quilts dry cleaned, as they are so heavy when completed.Rosiexx

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    1. Thanks so much, great advice about dry cleaning too, never even considered that! x

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  14. Beautiful quilt! I haven't made any quilts so can't offer any advice on the lining but I have used Tana lawn for all sorts of things (including bras and pants because I can't bear to throw even tiny scraps of it away) and it punches above its weight in terms of wear and robusticity. Susan x

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    1. I've used it a lot in dressmaking too and agree, it's definitely a workhorse of a fabric! x

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  15. Just use a good batting, I like Hobbs 80/20 myself. Way too much work to under-line it and it might bunch up or be hard to quilt through. Liberty is a good quality cotton.

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    1. Thanks so much for the batting advice, that was my next question! x

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  16. Use some good wadding - it's work beautifully

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    1. Definitely intend to, thank you! x

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  17. I have made some quilts Jane, and would ask you to consider a couple of things: if you want to hang the quilt, such as a wall quilt, then you do not have to have it lined. However, as you pointed out, Liberty lawns are very light; so an underlining of plain regular quilting cotton in a light shade would be advisable should you actually want to use the quilt. This would add stability, a little heft, and finish the quilt nicely as it would help it settle in during and after the quilting. Don't worry it won't quilt well, it will actually help since your Liberty is so light. I second the suggestions to use a good quality batting. If your quilt is washed, it should be washed in cool to lukewarm water at all times, preferably with an eco-type (gentle) liquid or powder washing solution.

    Very pretty by the way.

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    1. Excellent advice, thank you so much! x

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  18. My machine has a wavy line as an option. It would be an easy stitch to use to quilt ... just sew the wavy line over the sewing lines to make a grid. No need to obsess with perfection, and it looks like the squares are small enough that it would hold together well over time.

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  19. Jane this is so beautiful. I have no experience or advice for the next stage but I'm definitely coming back for help when I eventually do! x

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